Some Advice to Those New to PCMR and the Workforce

Posted this on reddit and it got some good traction so I want to share it here 🙂

Hey hey, Ascended and Ascending I just want to share some advice to new enthusiasts out there.

Many find out about this too late after massive stress and a complete feeling of being used. We all love to help each other and help those we work with but sometimes you need to step back and think. If your boss or co-workers ask "can you help me with an issue with my home computer" or "can you build or recommend a computer to me" Sadly say "I make it a personal rule to not provide tech support to co-workers after hours due to a conflict of interest"

You may think this is just a minor issue but the moment you open yourself up to help these people you will then be their personal "Free" tech support no matter what issue they have and may run into massive issues with people at work as they will then think during the work day or evenings and weekends they can take you away from what you are doing to rush over and help.

In my life of IT over 15 years now I have fallen into this trap many times and it has ruined great jobs for me, some cases being as small as "can I just drop it off to you and when you have time can you take a look" then the person calling multiple times all weekend, then saying it is a rush. Once fixed they will refuse to pay as they believe that since work pays you for the workday that covers after-hours work free for other employees. All the way up to CEO's telling me after hearing I repaired someone's computer at work that I need to help them run cat 5 throughout their whole house for weeks of after-hours free work or I was giving favoritism to someone else there.

Know what your time is worth and do not fall into the trap, Also think of other industries like mechanics and plumbers they do not fix their co-workers issues as they know if something goes wrong(and it will) a great workplace can become a living hell.

TL;DR Do not fix co-workers pc issues and respect yourself and your time.

I think it depends on the situation too. Here at work they were clearing out (selling to us) some older work laptops and a manager I knew asked me a bit of advice and I gave it to him, prefacing that I didn't know if it would work but was worth a shot. I guess because it worked I didn't have to deal with a situation like this.

@Arinoth said in Some Advice to Those New to PCMR and the Workforce:

I think it depends on the situation too. Here at work they were clearing out (selling to us) some older work laptops and a manager I knew asked me a bit of advice and I gave it to him, prefacing that I didn't know if it would work but was worth a shot. I guess because it worked I didn't have to deal with a situation like this.

that is true, this is more of the "recommend a new system, then build it, set it up and you are now 24/7 support"

I agree that this is an easy trap to fall into and I have already spent some time working on IT related equipment in older jobs, I figured it was not worth mentioning it in the future when I had moved, this has served me well. Now on occasion I have to help my friends with their IT issues but it is usually pretty easy, and if its not I tell them I dont know how to fix that issue.

@wedge22 Sounds like you have learned from first-hand experience as well

Tell people you only like old computers, not new computers in cars/appliances or phones.
A good addition is that you have not kept up with the times and everything modern is stupid because stupid companies keep removing your features and bloating/messing up UIs, and making you sign up for everything online with always-on connections and RAM and CPU prices are skyrocketing and argablargarg!
😁

If you get the reference:
the wound.jpg

last edited by Oelmuvun
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