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GTX 1070 Ti - OC - Continuing my voltage curve modifications


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If you have read my Y530 laptop tweaking adventures, it got me wanting to play with the same techniques on my 1070 Ti. While I am not after a max OC, I am after getting something for nothing (so to speak). I have set out to get my GPU running as fast and efficient as I can, while staying within the factory power envelope. In my laptop I was trying to get the max default boost speeds at lower voltages, but with this I was aiming for a bit of an OC, while still trying to improve efficiency.

Using afterburner I have done the following so far:

  1. Left the power and temp limits as per stock (most people start their OC by maxing these out, but as I said I don't necessarily want max fps, but more fps per watt)
  2. From there I opened the curve editor (ctrl+f) within afterburner.
  3. Based on some starting point info I had from others online I initially slid the entire curve up 201mhz (hold shift while sliding the curve in its entirety...didn't hit apply, for fear of a crash)...for some reason it wouldnt stay at 200....OCD did not like that
  4. My initial goal is an eye pleasing 2000mhz core, so I started sliding the right most points down to 2000mhz one at a time until the 1.1v mark (again, based on what I have seen online I figured this would be a sure safe starting point.
  5. After a benchmark run for 2-3 min I was content that it was stable enough to continue, so I would keep raising additional points to 2000 mhz moving left across the chart. This gets me the same 2000mhz at a lower voltage.

A work in progress, since I haven't had any artifacts yet, and haven't touched the memory.

Results so far:Stock - 1889 mhz @ 1.125v (max boost)Now - 2000 mhz @ 1.0v

Hopefully more to come.

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I just realized that I am now running a higher OC than RHR got in its review of the same card (not sure if it is actually the same one), but I assume I am at a lower voltage. It is possible the review was hitting a temp/power limit due to higher default voltages, vice an actual silicone limit. Food for thought.

https://www.realhardwarereviews.com/evga-gtx-1070ti/5/

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Played a little more. The boost algorithm has a mind of its own at times, but I am figuring it out. I now have one more voltage point upped getting me the 2000mhz @0.993v.

Despite what you set, the boost algorithm does play with things slightly. So far, while benching I got the following:

Custom fan curve. Remainder stock settings. Once the bench and temps/freqs stabilize:

1847mhz @ 1.05v and 68 deg

Same fan curve with my OC results in things stabilizing at:

1987mhz @ 0.993v and 64 deg.

More to come.

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Running oc scanner now. Its been going for 25 minutes. It goes through 4 voltage points and slowly increase clock spead on each one as it goes. If you bring up the curve editor prior to starting it, you can watch it go through all its testing. We will see.

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Well...I can draw a few conclusions of OC Scanner:1. It seems to do a great job for anyone that doesn't want to play around with settings/OC. It was a substantial improvement over stock.2. Not sure if it is my specific GPU or not, but when I increase the power limit from 100% to 120% in afterburner, it kept my GPU downclocking during the "scanner" to around 100%. I think this may have affected what the scanner recommended. 3. I was still able to push higher freq at a given voltage compared to the scanner results.

What I ended up doing, given my personal goals, was use the new freq/volt graph that it generated for the more efficient curve from low volts up to full load, but then I slid all points from 0.981v and up to 2010 mhz (this was a few points up in freq, and a bunch of high voltage points down).

End result (under load after the boost algorithm does it's thing), I am at the same 1987mhz, but now at 0.981v...but I have a nicer looking freq curve than I originally started with.

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The above is the results of my playing.

Boost settles nicely at 100% load at 1987mhz with 0.963v (.95 caused issues...stable so far with the .963).

The bottom line is that vs stock loaded up and stabilized it is running 140mhz faster at lower voltage, lower temp, and lower % power consumption. The memory also seems to OC very well (had it at +500 in afterburner, but I decided to settle at +200 for now unless I find I need more in the future). The bottom line is the stock curve.

Also threw my custom fan curve in. Idle to 37, then ramps up. Temps stabilize at 64 deg (vs 68 stock with the same fan curve and lower freq).

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Nice. Looks very similar to what the scanner gave for me. The difference being I manually raised the 950-963mv points a bit more, and then flat lined it from there to stop it from going to higher voltages. Have you OC'd the vram? Also, did you notice, or if you get a chance, can you see if yours is allowing >100% power? You can select %power in afterburner, and have it as monitorable. Under game load it is not an issue, but as I said a couple posts ago, when I set it to 120% for the "scanner" it was recognized in the text that it was at 120%, but when it was running through step3 and 4 of the voltage test points it was throttling down voltage to maintain ~100% (as monitored in the chart and visible in the freq/volt curve.

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